Blog

1828 - Jules Verne
Dubbed the literary father of science fiction, Jules Verne was born on February 8, 1828 in Nantes, France. It was there in Nantes, a port city, that Jules first became fascinated with travel, adventure, and exploration on the sea, urgently seeking whatever was just beyond the horizon.
Celebrating #NationalAuthorsDay on November 1
Every November 1, we celebrate #NationalAuthorsDay. In 1928, Nellie Verne Burt McPherson, president of the Bement, Illinois Women’s Club, developed the idea to celebrate American authors.
7753 - The Unexpected Mona
7753 is a perfume about hands softly overlapped, eyes gently inquisitive, and lips smirked oh so subtly. 7753 is a perfume about a woman unexpected. The Unexpected Mona by Histoires de Parfums.
1899 — Ernest Hemingway
In the July heat of 1899, the great American novelist Ernest Hemingway was born. But Hemingway’s expanse was beyond what is typically considered “American.”
1725 — Giacomo Casanova
An adventurer, intellectual, spy, musician, diplomat and writer, Giacomo Casanova was a magnetic man of many hats. His savvy was his currency. 1725 eau de parfum is reminiscent of the enterprising Casanova.
1740: The Marquis de Sade
The Marquis de Sade, unflinchingly decadent, depraved, and resolute, was no fictitious character. Indeed we have distilled his legacy and spirit in 1740 eau de parfum, however this is just the beginning of understanding this licentious character.
Restaurant to be: Elmer

In the third arrondissement a blue facade that invites you to discover & travel while diving in the heart of the best French products.

READ MORE

November 16, 1945: Establishment of UNESCO

In the midst of World War II, a reproach was called to order to prevent conflict from arising between other states. From this, UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) was established. Over the last 70 years, UNESCO has been an advocate of international peace and support.

READ MORE

Galbanum

Originally from Iran, responsible for the entire world production, galbanum is the star of perfumers when it comes to creating green notes.

READ MORE

November 24, 1789: Don't let the sun in!

While roaming around France's historic cities, you'll undoubtedly see walled up doors and windows. The reason? Far from aesthetic enhancements, doors and windows were walled up for economic reasons.

READ MORE

Shop Milano

Histoires de Parfums welcomes you in the heart of Milan, Via Madonnina 17, in its ephemeral shop until the end of 2019.

READ MORE

Milan International

The International Expositions of 1906 and 2015 held in Milan were true depictions of cultural fairs that allowed the Milanese to expo all Italian skills.

READ MORE

Milanese Escapades

Welcome to Milan, the heart of northern Italy! Visit our boutique and discover the most historic landmarks of the capital.

READ MORE

Saffron

Risotto Milanese is the emblematic food of the Lombardi capital.

READ MORE

Restaurant to be

In need of a break before your next tour? We got you! Check out patisserie Di Vole di Liquirizia across from our boutique for some Milanese, Neapolitan, American and French desserts.

READ MORE

Pâtisserie Bontemps

This summer, in between your tours of Paris, stop by for a tea break at the pâtisserie Bontemps in the Marais.

READ MORE

Tuberose

Tuberose is considered to be the most fragrant plant in the world and gives off a strong, suave and captivating scent that heightens after sundown...

READ MORE

August 15-18, 1969: Woodstock

"3 days of peace, love and music": this was the slogan of the music festival that would go down in history as THE festival of festivals.

READ MORE

August 25, 1819: The Raft of the Medusa

A tragedy that inspired what is recognized today as the one of the most emblematic paintings of the French Romanticism movement.

READ MORE

Patchouli

Patchouli is a plant originally from Indonesia and Malaysia. Patchouli is used in the composition of chypre, woody and oriental perfumes.

READ MORE

July 1, 1751: Publication of the Encyclopedia's first volumes

The Encyclopedia, a simple translation that became a titanic work in order to avoid obscurantism.

READ MORE