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Galbanum

Originally from Iran, responsible for the entire world production, galbanum is the star of perfumers when it comes to creating green notes.

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Saffron

Risotto Milanese is the emblematic food of the Lombardi capital.

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Tuberose

Tuberose is considered to be the most fragrant plant in the world and gives off a strong, suave and captivating scent that heightens after sundown...

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Patchouli

Patchouli is a plant originally from Indonesia and Malaysia. Patchouli is used in the composition of chypre, woody and oriental perfumes.

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Rose

Native to Asia Minor, the rose has been crowned "Queen of the flowers" since antiquity, the rose is the icon of the flower world both because of her culture and symbolism.

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Hydroxycitronellal

Certain flowers in perfumery are considered "mute". This means that it's impossible to extract the necessary amount of essential oil from the flower itself.

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Aldehyde

Aldehyde was discovered in 1835, and is categorized by the length of its carbon chain (the number of carbon atoms present in a molecule). The length of this chain varies between 1 and 12 carbon atoms.

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Tonka Beans

The Tonka bean comes from a tropical tree in South America. It is used in cooking as well as in medicine, and has revolutionized the world of perfumery. Its fragrance, mostly made up of coumarin, has introduced the world to fern-based scents.

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Ambroxan

Developped in the 50's, ambroxan was used as a replacement to natural ambergris in perfumes. Its sensual scents and numerous facets made it a major player in modern perfumery, and can also be found in oriental perfumes as well as floral, aromatic, fruity and woody fragrances.

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The Sandalwood

Also called “liquid gold”, sandalwood has been used for more than 4000 years in Asia because of its numerous medicinal or olfactory properties. 

Known in form of incense since the dawn of time, its use in perfumery dates only from the 19th century. Its olfactory roundness and ability to sublimate other notes quickly made it a must in modern perfume.

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The Orange

Very present in Eau de Cologne, orange is part of the citrus fruit family just like other citrus fruits, lemon, bergamot or grapefruit.

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Cardamom

Since antiquity, from Asia to the Mediterranean, cardamom has been used for its medicinal and olfactory qualities. Originally from India, cardamom is currently the third most consumed spice in the world after saffron and vanilla.

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Iris

Iris is one of the most expensive raw materials on the market in perfumery. Despite having over two hundred different species, only three are used to create perfumes.

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Lavender

Lavender, the emblematic plant of Provence (south-east region of France), recognized since antiquity for its aromatic and therapeutic qualities, has taken a long time to instill itself as a staple in the world of perfumery. It's only in the beginning of the XXth century, that we see the first lavender fields.

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Carnations

There are over 300 types of carnations, which are all symbolic plants with a deep history. In perfumery, however, it is a little more complicated considering each perfumer must create his own carnation.

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Patchouli

Its earthy and woody hints form a mysteriousand powerful scent that makes the patchouli an essential fragrance in modern perfumery.

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The Oud

Agarwood, wood of the gods, eaglewood… All these terms, define the agarwood whose unique scent makes it one of the most treasured goods in perfumery.

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