Summery Cocktails and Scented Concoctions

Pineapple Meets Pineapple

National Piña Colada Day
Date: July 10th
Drink: Piña Colada
Scent: 1804
1804 and a Piña Colada
The Piña Colada is an easygoing, luscious cocktail of creamy coconut milk, quenching pineapple, and sweet rum. Inspired by the brazenly feminist and alluring George Sand, 1804 features key notes of Hawaiian Pineapple, Tahitian Gardenia and Vanilla. A match in both flavor, form, and dare we say concept, 1804 packs just as much of a pleasant and powerful punch as the beloved Piña Colada.


Camphoreous and Cool

National Mojito Day
Date: July 11th
Drink: Mojito
Scent: 1828
1828 and a Mojito
Refreshing from cooling mint, a spritz of lime and of course white rum, the Mojito is the drink of high summer, when cooling down is the only thing on your mind. Jules Verne, the inspiration of 1828, took to the sea in life and in word. The cool and invigorating world of the sea remained part of him forever from his childhood in the port city of Nantes, France. The key and unique note of Eucalyptus in 1828 is uniquely camphoreous—dry and cool—reminiscent of Verne's own life and the Mojito.


Aye Mate, Where's the Rum?

National Rum Day
Date: July 19th
Drink: Daiquiri
Scent: 1899
1899 and a Daiquiri
The traditional Daiquiri is a concise yet effective drink of rum, lime, and simple syrup. Praised ad infinitum for his succinct style in writing is none other than Ernest Hemingway: an iconic author also infamous for his love of drink, particularly Rum. In the Caribbean, what better drink than rum? And on national Daiquiri day, what better scent than 1899, imagined for Hemingway himself.


A Smooth Scent for a Stiff Drink

National Scotch Day
Date: July 27th
Drink: Scotch
Scent: 1740
1740 and Scotch
While not technically a cocktail, Scotch alone is a complete drink that many would say is better left uncorrupted—even by ice. This way, the faceted depths of the drink can bloom. And we cannot speak of corruption and depths without speaking of the depraved Marquis de Sade: founder of sadism and a whole new world of sexual fantasy in Eighteenth century France. One to enjoy the finer things in life, surely he could appreciate the bracing power of a neat pour of Scotch. In 1740 is an olfactory experience as smooth, deep, and seductive as the Marquis, the perfect complement for the day of Scotch. 

 

*Histoires de Parfums and the information it provides is intended solely for the entertainment of responsible adults of legal drinking age in their respective country and/or state and/or province. 

Histoires de Parfums does not advocate the abuse of alcoholic beverages and it is expected that if you try the recipes and/or other material provided on this web site, you do so responsibly, with moderation and with caution. 

Histoires de Parfums does not, under any circumstances, accept responsibility for any damages that result to yourself or anyone else due to the consumption of alcoholic beverages. We cannot take any responsibility for the effect this drink may have on people.


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